How to Make Your Blood Sugar Chart Work for You

A blood sugar chart is an important tool to help you manage your blood sugar levels. The more thoroughly and precisely you use your blood sugar log, the better you’ll be able to manage your diabetes. Use these tips to make sure your making your blood sugar monitoring work optimally for you.

Know Your Normal Glucose Sugar Level

 

For most diabetics, normal blood sugar is between 70 and 140mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). But those are extremes that you should avoid. After an examination and blood test, your doctor will give you a more narrow range that you can manage. Write this range in your log so you’ll always know where your blood sugar should lie._blood-sugar cup cake

Once you know your acceptable range, keep close track of your normal glucose sugar level by testing after meals two to four times a day. Never assume your blood sugar levels by high or low glucose sugar symptoms. Test each time using your blood sugar meter. Test at the same time each day whenever possible and record the results in your blood sugar chart immediately so you don’t forget.

 

Supplement Your Blood Sugar Chart

 

A chart that just keeps track of your levels will go far in helping you monitor your control. But it can do much more. When used correctly, it will inform you about how your daily activities affect your blood sugar levels from hour to hour.

A great way to make your chart work hard for you is to keep a supplemental diary. In the diary, keep careful records of your daily activities. Start by writing down what you eat, how much you eat and when you eat it. Don’t forget to include drinks and snacks. Also record your medication and exercise, the time you took it, its quality and duration.

Whenever your blood sugar levels are outside their range or different from the usual, refer to your supplemental diary. Then in the notes section of your blood sugar chart, write down any unusual activity that might have affected the strange levels. If nothing was out of the ordinary, note that too. The notes may help you and your doctor come up with a solution at your next appointment.

 

Get Your A1C Level Checked

 

An A1C (sometimes refered to as Hemoglobin A1c) test measures the amount of glucose that sticks to your red blood cells. This glucose count gives physicians a good idea of your average blood sugar levels during the life of the red blood cells. Since blood cells have a lifespan of roughly 3 to 4 months, newly diagnosed diabetics should have an A1C test once every three months.

High blood sugar

High blood sugar

Your blood sugar chart and your A1C test will give your doctor a complete picture of how your blood sugar management is going. Your careful notation of your lifestyle habits in your blood sugar log will help the doctor recommend certain non-invasive lifestyle changes. These changes in conjunction with continued monitoring will help you better manage your blood sugar and prevent the diabetes related diseases that often result from unstable levels.

Once repeated A1C tests show that your blood sugar levels
are acceptable and stable, you won’t have to go for A1C tests as often. Stable diabetics may only have to have their levels tested once or twice per year to make sure that they are still on track. This reduction in testing is one of the best signs that your chart is working optimally to prolong your life and increase its quality.

A chart can be your best and most useful tool in the fight against the ravages of diabetes. But only if you use it correctly to thoroughly record and investigate the nature of your blood sugar levels. Commit to your blood sugar chart and your health and you’ll live a longer, healthier life.

 

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