Posts Tagged ‘blood sugar log’

How to Make Your Blood Sugar Chart Work for You

A blood sugar chart is an important tool to help you manage your blood sugar levels. The more thoroughly and precisely you use your blood sugar log, the better you’ll be able to manage your diabetes. Use these tips to make sure your making your blood sugar monitoring work optimally for you.

Know Your Normal Glucose Sugar Level

 

For most diabetics, normal blood sugar is between 70 and 140mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). But those are extremes that you should avoid. After an examination and blood test, your doctor will give you a more narrow range that you can manage. Write this range in your log so you’ll always know where your blood sugar should lie._blood-sugar cup cake

Once you know your acceptable range, keep close track of your normal glucose sugar level by testing after meals two to four times a day. Never assume your blood sugar levels by high or low glucose sugar symptoms. Test each time using your blood sugar meter. Test at the same time each day whenever possible and record the results in your blood sugar chart immediately so you don’t forget.

 

Supplement Your Blood Sugar Chart

 

A chart that just keeps track of your levels will go far in helping you monitor your control. But it can do much more. When used correctly, it will inform you about how your daily activities affect your blood sugar levels from hour to hour.

A great way to make your chart work hard for you is to keep a supplemental diary. In the diary, keep careful records of your daily activities. Start by writing down what you eat, how much you eat and when you eat it. Don’t forget to include drinks and snacks. Also record your medication and exercise, the time you took it, its quality and duration.

Whenever your blood sugar levels are outside their range or different from the usual, refer to your supplemental diary. Then in the notes section of your blood sugar chart, write down any unusual activity that might have affected the strange levels. If nothing was out of the ordinary, note that too. The notes may help you and your doctor come up with a solution at your next appointment.

 

Get Your A1C Level Checked

 

An A1C (sometimes refered to as Hemoglobin A1c) test measures the amount of glucose that sticks to your red blood cells. This glucose count gives physicians a good idea of your average blood sugar levels during the life of the red blood cells. Since blood cells have a lifespan of roughly 3 to 4 months, newly diagnosed diabetics should have an A1C test once every three months.

High blood sugar

High blood sugar

Your blood sugar chart and your A1C test will give your doctor a complete picture of how your blood sugar management is going. Your careful notation of your lifestyle habits in your blood sugar log will help the doctor recommend certain non-invasive lifestyle changes. These changes in conjunction with continued monitoring will help you better manage your blood sugar and prevent the diabetes related diseases that often result from unstable levels.

Once repeated A1C tests show that your blood sugar levels
are acceptable and stable, you won’t have to go for A1C tests as often. Stable diabetics may only have to have their levels tested once or twice per year to make sure that they are still on track. This reduction in testing is one of the best signs that your chart is working optimally to prolong your life and increase its quality.

A chart can be your best and most useful tool in the fight against the ravages of diabetes. But only if you use it correctly to thoroughly record and investigate the nature of your blood sugar levels. Commit to your blood sugar chart and your health and you’ll live a longer, healthier life.

 

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The Importance of Blood Sugar Test Logs

After your diagnosis, one of the first things your doctor will recommend is a blood sugar log. If used correctly, this log will be one of the most important keys to your continued health. To make sure you’re using your log to its potential, first familiarize yourself with its uses and your particular needs.

 

Why You Need a Blood Sugar LogBlood sugar log

 

Diabetes is a manageable disease — if managed well. A blood sugar log helps patients do just that. When used in conjunction with insulin, a blood sugar test log adds another dimension to your monitoring efforts. It’s a physical account that you can frequently go back to tweak and adjust your habits to suit your needs.

Your blood sugar isn’t just affected by the food you eat. Exercise, medication and other activities also affect blood sugar levels. That’s a lot to keep track of. Putting it in a blood sugar test log makes all the different aspects of your lifestyle much more manageable.

Diabetics who know exactly how their lifestyle and choices affect their blood sugar can make moment to moment decisions concerning their levels. This up to the minute monitoring is the key to diabetes management. By avoiding unnecessary swings in blood sugar levels, you can also avoid or delay diabetes related diseases like eye disease, kidney problems and neuropathy.

 

Your Normal Blood Sugar Level: How to Monitor It

 

Everyone’s diabetes is different. Patients should start their diabetes management program by asking their health care providers to recommend a blood sugar range that is suitable for them. Once you have an acceptable range in mind, it’s time to start testing.

Blood sugar must be monitored frequently to prevent and predict highs and lows. Most diabetics must test two to four times daily or the number of times recommended by their doctors. Testing is done with a diabetic testing kit.

In addition to recording blood sugar readings, diabetics should also record their activities. Keep track of the dosage and frequency of the medication you take, the amount and nature of what you eat and drink and any exercise you take. Times are also important for record taking. Get in the habit of watching the clock when you eat, exercise and take your medication.

A normal blood sugar level for most people is between 70 and 140 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). If your blood sugar levels are abnormally high or low or you experience unexplainable high or low blood sugar symptoms, use the comments section of your blood sugar log to record any abnormal activities. Did you eat later than usual? Was your exercise particularly long? Did you forget to take your medication? Comparing abnormal highs and lows will help you eliminate and rectify changes.

 

Recording in Your Blood Sugar Test Logblood sugar test log

 

The first thing you should write in your blood sugar log is the blood sugar range goal you discussed with your physician. Once you start testing your blood sugar, write down each blood sugar reading and the date and time you took it. Try to test your blood sugar at the same times every day. This consistency will help you more easily notice patterns.

Every three months, take your log to your doctor and have an A1C level test performed. This test monitors how much glucose adheres to your red blood cells which replenish themselves every 3 to 4 months.

By monitoring your average blood glucose levels, your physician will determine and evaluate your blood sugar control for the past four months. Depending on your levels and the information in your log book, your physician may make recommendations or even change your medication.

Once your blood sugar levels are static — with the help of your log, you don’t have to have A1C tests as frequently. Most doctors will recommend visits only twice annually. This is a good sign that you’ve used your resources and your log book to manage your blood sugar to the best of your ability.

Monitoring your blood sugar levels is the key to staying healthy. Diabetics with the best prognosis are those who are active about their control. With the help of a blood sugar log and a physician, you’ll live a longer and healthier life.

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