Posts Tagged ‘Diabetes mellitus’

Diabetes Symptoms in Men

 

 

Formerly known as adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin dependant diabetes, type 2 diabetes is the most common form of this diseases, and affects between 90% and 95% of the estimated 13 million males who suffer from diabetes.

 

Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin.  Those with type 2 diabetes do produce insulin, but the pancreas does not secrete enough of this chemical or their bodies are unable to recognize and utilize the insulin that is produced, in a condition known as insulin resistance.  Whether the diabetes symptoms in men are from insulin levels that are low or not being used properly, it is not possible for glucose, a form of sugar, to provide the energy needed to fuel the cells.  As a result, sugar levels in the blood increase but the cells do not function correctly.  The increased levels of glucose in the blood lead to various symptoms.

 

Who Is Affected?

 

Anyone can be affected by this disease.  However, those who are obese or overweight, women who suffered gestational diabetes while pregnant, individuals with a family history of the disease and individuals with metabolic syndrome, which includes several problems such as high overall cholesterol, low HDL levels, high triglycerides, high LDL levels and higher than normal blood pressure.  Additionally, the body becomes more susceptible to developing the disease as the body ages and becomes less tolerant of sugars.

 

What Causes this Condition?

 

While much more common than juvenile onset diabetes, this form, type 2 diabetes, is less well understood.  In all likelihood, multiple factors lead to the condition instead of a single problem.

 

Type II diabetes sometimes runs in families; however, research has not yet shown how it is inherited nor is there a single genetic factor known to cause the disease.

 

Diabetes Symptoms in MenDiabetes Symptoms in Men

Symptoms of individuals with this condition vary from one person to another but often include”

 

• Blurred vision.

• Increased thirst.

• Dry mouth.

• Fatigue

• Frequent urination.

• Increased hunger (often worse after meals).

• Nausea

• Occasionally vomiting.

• Frequent infections affecting the urinary tract or skin.

• Tingling or numbness of the feet or hands.

 

In rare instances, the individual is diagnosed with the condition after entering the medical facility after falling into a coma.

 

Diagnosis

 

When health professionals suspect this condition, they begin with a check for high blood sugar levels or other abnormalities in the blood.  They might also test for sugar or other markers in the urine.Diabetes Symptoms in Men

 

The doctor may use a casual plasma test or a fasting plasma glucose test to diagnose this diabetes

 

Diabetes Complications

 

When the condition is not well controlled it can lead to serious or even life threatening complications for the sufferer.  These sympyoms include:

 

• Retinopathy. This is an abnormality of the eyes related to the development of diabetes.  Even though an individual has no vision problems when initially found to have the condition, many develop problems related to the eyes over time.  To prevent progression of vision problems, one should take steps to control blood sugars, hypertension and cholesterol.  Fortunately, most people do not have significant vision loss.

• Kidney damage. The risk of developing kidney disease also increases over time.  This means the longer one has diabetes, the greater his or her risk for the disease.  Kidney damage can cause significant other serious illnesses, including kidney failure or heart disease.

• Nerve damage and poor blood circulation. The damage to one’s nerves and hardening of the individual’s arteries can decrease feeling and blood circulation to the feet.  This leads to greater risk of infections and ulcers which often heal poorly.  These ulcers raise the risk of the need for amputation.  Damaged nerves can also lead to problems with the digestive system, including vomiting, nausea or diarrhea that can also lead to more serious conditions.

 

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How the Blood Sugar Affects the Body

Diabetes mellitus is a type of condition that leads to the persistent elevation of the level of blood sugar. Increased sugar levels in the body can be very dangerous since it can lead to several health problems that are linked with diabetes. To learn more about the effects and causes of blood sugar elevation, read on.

 

Understanding Insulin Reactions and Diabetic Shock

 

Diabetic shock can also be considered as severe hypoglycemia. This problem is a serious health risk that is common in people with diabetes. This condition is also known as insulin reaction since it is a result of too much insulin in the body. Diabetic shock also occurs whenever there is an imbalance between the insulin level in the body and the amount of food the person eats. Aside from this, severe hypoglycemia can also happen without any warning. This is due to the fact that the symptoms of diabetic shock are very mild at first, which makes it difficult for the person to detect or notice.health event _diabetes-blood-sugar-test

 

Learning More about Diabetes and the Normal Blood Glucose Level in the Body

Nowadays, doctors would diagnosis prediabetes and diabetes based on the arbitrary cut off point of the normal level of blood sugar. The standard normal blood sugar level should be less than 100 mg/dL. However, this rate varies depending on the instrument used in getting the results. Some also consider 60 as the normal, while others use 90. Nevertheless, anything that is less than 100 mg/dL is recognized as normal if the person is fasting.

 

******************Low sugar level also varies depending on several factors. Normally, people’s blood sugar leve does not go below 60 mg/dL even if he or she is fasting. This is caused by the liver, which turns fat and muscle into sugar in order to compensate for the low glucose intake of the body. This makes it difficult to drop the sugar levels to the unsafe point without using any diabetes drug or experiencing any uncommon medical problems.

 

More Facts about Glucose Levels and Diabetes

Sugar levels that are higher than the normal rate can be considered an indication for diabetes or prediabetes. There are actually several ways in order to diagnose or determine diabetes. Here are some of the examples.

 

• Fasting Plasma Glucose Test — Diabetes can be identified using the Fasting Plasma Glucose Test. When the blood sugar level of a person is higher than 126 mg/dL even after fasting for 8 hours, the person may be considered diabetic.

Oral Glucose Tolerance Test — This method involves the provision of a special sugary drink to a person after 8 hours of fasting. If the person has a sugar level of more than 200 mg/dL after drinking the beverage, he or she can be considered Diabetes - insulin shotdiabetic.

• Random Blood Sugar Level — If the person experiences symptoms such as increased urination, weight loss, and thirst, with a blood sugar level or more than 200, he or she is said to be diabetic. However, random blood tests will require fasting sugar level or the oral tolerance test in order to confirm the results.

 

Information about Prediabetes

Diabetes is a very difficult condition to control. Because of this, proper management and diet is necessary in order to retain the blood sugar level within the normal range. There are also instances where in the blood glucose level of the person is above the normal rate, but the full blown symptoms are not manifested. This condition is commonly called as prediabetes.

 

According to the American Diabetes Association, there are more than 79 million Americans who are prediabetic. Prediabetic individuals are most likely 5 to 6 times at risk of developing diabetes in the near future. Aside from this, prediabetes can also increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. With the help of regular diet and exercise, it is easy to prevent prediabetes from turning to diabetes.

 

The Bad Effects of High Blood Sugar Levels

High sugar level in the body can be considered as a slow acting poison. In other words, the hazardous effects of diabetes to health are slow but continuous. Here are some common effects of hyperglycemia in the body.

 

• Hyperglycemia or high sugar levels can prevent the pancreas from making insulin. Whenever the pancreas over compensates for the high blood sugar level in the body, it can get damaged, which can affect the health of the person.

• High sugar levels can cause other diseases such as atherosclerosis. This type of problem is described as the hardening of the blood vessels.

Aside from the blood vessels in the body, high blood sugar can also affect other organs. Some of the complications that can be brought about by diabetes include the following:

 

• Stroke

• Heart Attack

• Erectile Dysfunction

• Immune system suppression and increased risk for infections

• Kidney problems and diseases

• Poor circulation of blood in the lower extremities

• Blindness or poor vision

• Neuropathy or nerve damage

• Poor wound healing that can lead to amputation

 

Keeping the blood sugar level normal is very helpful in preventing the complications of diabetes. It is important that the sugar level in the blood is within 70 to 130 mg/dL before meals and less than 180 mg/dL after eating.

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Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

The medical community contributes the name diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) to a group of disorders where the body cannot regulate its blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2.

 

Diabetes Mellitus

 

Type 1 diabetes which is also called insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes, involves immune system disorders of the body. Our immune system protects us from bacteria, viruses, or other materials. Type 1 diabetes diagnosed in age 30+ adults may be LADA (or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults). This is also called type 1.5 diabetes. Because of the age at which it first occurs, LADA is often incorrectly thought to be type 2 diabetes. However, with LADA, people are not insulin resistant like a person with type 2 diabetes. The characteristics of LADA are: age of onset, no known family history of type 2, positive antibodies, gradual increases in insulin demands, and lessened ability to make insulin which is indicated when the person has a low C-peptide. A fourth, rare diabetes strikes newborns,(monogenic) but is typically mistaken for type 1 diabetes.

English: idealized curves of human blood gluco...

English: idealized curves of human blood glucose and insulin concentrations during the course of a day containing three meals; in addition, effect of sugar-rich meal is highlighted. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Type One Diabetes

 

Type 1 diabetes happens when your body’s immune system suppresses specific cells in your pancreas. The pancreas is about as big as your hand and found behind the lower portion of your abdomen. These beta cells are held, along with others, within tiny islands known as pancreatic islets. Beta cells typically make insulin, which is a hormone that helps your body propel the glucose in your food into cells throughout your body which consumes it as energy. When these beta cells are attacked and destroyed, no insulin can be made and glucose remains in your blood, causing severe damage within your body’s organs.

 

Because of this, if you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to live. This means numerous injections everyday or the use of an insulin pump, and also numerous blood sugar tests by finger pricks 6 or more times daily.  People who are diabetic must also maintain a balance between what they eat and exercise to adjust their blood sugar level to avoid either low blood sugar (hypoglycemic) or high blood sugar (hyperglycemic) conditions that can be deadly.

 

Warning Signs of Type 1

 

Warning signs of type 1 diabetes include frequent urination, excessive thirst, sugar in urine, lethargy or sleepiness, a bigger appetite, weight loss that occurs suddenly, fruity or sweet smell on your breath,sudden changes in your vision, heavy breathing, loss of consciousness, and dulled senses.

Type 1 diabetes is typically found in young children all the way through young adulthood. Scientist do not know the precise cause of this disease, but they do believe that genetic, environmental, and autoimmune elements make up a part of the disease’s process.

 

 

 

 

 

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How to Make Your Blood Sugar Chart Work for You

A blood sugar chart is an important tool to help you manage your blood sugar levels. The more thoroughly and precisely you use your blood sugar log, the better you’ll be able to manage your diabetes. Use these tips to make sure your making your blood sugar monitoring work optimally for you.

Know Your Normal Glucose Sugar Level

 

For most diabetics, normal blood sugar is between 70 and 140mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). But those are extremes that you should avoid. After an examination and blood test, your doctor will give you a more narrow range that you can manage. Write this range in your log so you’ll always know where your blood sugar should lie._blood-sugar cup cake

Once you know your acceptable range, keep close track of your normal glucose sugar level by testing after meals two to four times a day. Never assume your blood sugar levels by high or low glucose sugar symptoms. Test each time using your blood sugar meter. Test at the same time each day whenever possible and record the results in your blood sugar chart immediately so you don’t forget.

 

Supplement Your Blood Sugar Chart

 

A chart that just keeps track of your levels will go far in helping you monitor your control. But it can do much more. When used correctly, it will inform you about how your daily activities affect your blood sugar levels from hour to hour.

A great way to make your chart work hard for you is to keep a supplemental diary. In the diary, keep careful records of your daily activities. Start by writing down what you eat, how much you eat and when you eat it. Don’t forget to include drinks and snacks. Also record your medication and exercise, the time you took it, its quality and duration.

Whenever your blood sugar levels are outside their range or different from the usual, refer to your supplemental diary. Then in the notes section of your blood sugar chart, write down any unusual activity that might have affected the strange levels. If nothing was out of the ordinary, note that too. The notes may help you and your doctor come up with a solution at your next appointment.

 

Get Your A1C Level Checked

 

An A1C (sometimes refered to as Hemoglobin A1c) test measures the amount of glucose that sticks to your red blood cells. This glucose count gives physicians a good idea of your average blood sugar levels during the life of the red blood cells. Since blood cells have a lifespan of roughly 3 to 4 months, newly diagnosed diabetics should have an A1C test once every three months.

High blood sugar

High blood sugar

Your blood sugar chart and your A1C test will give your doctor a complete picture of how your blood sugar management is going. Your careful notation of your lifestyle habits in your blood sugar log will help the doctor recommend certain non-invasive lifestyle changes. These changes in conjunction with continued monitoring will help you better manage your blood sugar and prevent the diabetes related diseases that often result from unstable levels.

Once repeated A1C tests show that your blood sugar levels
are acceptable and stable, you won’t have to go for A1C tests as often. Stable diabetics may only have to have their levels tested once or twice per year to make sure that they are still on track. This reduction in testing is one of the best signs that your chart is working optimally to prolong your life and increase its quality.

A chart can be your best and most useful tool in the fight against the ravages of diabetes. But only if you use it correctly to thoroughly record and investigate the nature of your blood sugar levels. Commit to your blood sugar chart and your health and you’ll live a longer, healthier life.

 

The Importance of Blood Sugar Test Logs

After your diagnosis, one of the first things your doctor will recommend is a blood sugar log. If used correctly, this log will be one of the most important keys to your continued health. To make sure you’re using your log to its potential, first familiarize yourself with its uses and your particular needs.

 

Why You Need a Blood Sugar LogBlood sugar log

 

Diabetes is a manageable disease — if managed well. A blood sugar log helps patients do just that. When used in conjunction with insulin, a blood sugar test log adds another dimension to your monitoring efforts. It’s a physical account that you can frequently go back to tweak and adjust your habits to suit your needs.

Your blood sugar isn’t just affected by the food you eat. Exercise, medication and other activities also affect blood sugar levels. That’s a lot to keep track of. Putting it in a blood sugar test log makes all the different aspects of your lifestyle much more manageable.

Diabetics who know exactly how their lifestyle and choices affect their blood sugar can make moment to moment decisions concerning their levels. This up to the minute monitoring is the key to diabetes management. By avoiding unnecessary swings in blood sugar levels, you can also avoid or delay diabetes related diseases like eye disease, kidney problems and neuropathy.

 

Your Normal Blood Sugar Level: How to Monitor It

 

Everyone’s diabetes is different. Patients should start their diabetes management program by asking their health care providers to recommend a blood sugar range that is suitable for them. Once you have an acceptable range in mind, it’s time to start testing.

Blood sugar must be monitored frequently to prevent and predict highs and lows. Most diabetics must test two to four times daily or the number of times recommended by their doctors. Testing is done with a diabetic testing kit.

In addition to recording blood sugar readings, diabetics should also record their activities. Keep track of the dosage and frequency of the medication you take, the amount and nature of what you eat and drink and any exercise you take. Times are also important for record taking. Get in the habit of watching the clock when you eat, exercise and take your medication.

A normal blood sugar level for most people is between 70 and 140 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). If your blood sugar levels are abnormally high or low or you experience unexplainable high or low blood sugar symptoms, use the comments section of your blood sugar log to record any abnormal activities. Did you eat later than usual? Was your exercise particularly long? Did you forget to take your medication? Comparing abnormal highs and lows will help you eliminate and rectify changes.

 

Recording in Your Blood Sugar Test Logblood sugar test log

 

The first thing you should write in your blood sugar log is the blood sugar range goal you discussed with your physician. Once you start testing your blood sugar, write down each blood sugar reading and the date and time you took it. Try to test your blood sugar at the same times every day. This consistency will help you more easily notice patterns.

Every three months, take your log to your doctor and have an A1C level test performed. This test monitors how much glucose adheres to your red blood cells which replenish themselves every 3 to 4 months.

By monitoring your average blood glucose levels, your physician will determine and evaluate your blood sugar control for the past four months. Depending on your levels and the information in your log book, your physician may make recommendations or even change your medication.

Once your blood sugar levels are static — with the help of your log, you don’t have to have A1C tests as frequently. Most doctors will recommend visits only twice annually. This is a good sign that you’ve used your resources and your log book to manage your blood sugar to the best of your ability.

Monitoring your blood sugar levels is the key to staying healthy. Diabetics with the best prognosis are those who are active about their control. With the help of a blood sugar log and a physician, you’ll live a longer and healthier life.

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