Posts Tagged ‘Diabetes’

Is Brittle Diabetes The Most Dangerous?

Brittle Diabetes is a volatile form of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Unstable blood sugar levels cause sufferers a host of physical problems which eventually lead to a shortened lifespan. And although only 1 to 2 percent of type 1 diabetics suffer from this extreme form of the disease, it is considered the most dangerous forms of diabetes known today.

 

BRITTLE DIABETES TYPE ONE: WHAT IS IT?

 

Brittle Diabetes, also known as labile or volatile diabetes, is a form of Type 1 diabetes mellitus defined by blood sugar instability. Many diabetics experience occasional blood sugar instability even when taking insulin or other diabetes Brittle Diabetesmedications. However, these diabetics experience wide and unpredictable swings in blood sugar that may not respond to traditional treatment.

 

BRITTLE DIABETES: CAUSES

 

The root cause for all Brittle Diabetes is low insulin levels. However, the cause for these low insulin levels varies from person to person. If you suffer from this type of diabetes, you may suffer from other related disorders like:

 

  • Autonomic neuropathy: This is one of the most common causes of this dangerous type of diabetes. As nerves die in the digestive track — a consequence of type 1 diabetes — the bowels function more slower than usual. Consequently, insulin is absorbed more slowly and fails to control the body’s blood sugar levels.

 

  • Poor insulin absorption: Diabetics with poor insulin absorption have trouble producing insulin and just as much trouble absorbing supplemental insulin. This means that even with medication their body cannot internalize enough insulin to regulate their blood sugar.

 

  • Drug interaction: Some drugs like alcohol and anti-psychotics can interfere with insulin or other diabetes medications. That interference nullifies the effect of medication and leads to unstable blood sugar levels.

 

  • Other medical problems: There are a number of medical problems that can result in unstable diabetes. Addison’s disease, poor thyroid or adrenal function and other disorders can affect blood sugar levels or the body’s receptiveness to insulin.

 

Labile diabetes can have a number of underlying causes. Many of those causes are treatable. If you suspect that you have unstable diabetes, it is important to talk to your physician. The sooner you seek treatment, the more quickly you can find a brittle diabetes management program to reduce its effect on your life.

 

BRITTLE DIABETES: LIFE EXPECTANCY

 

Labile diabetes is defined by its profound effects. The swings in blood sugar that these diabetics experience significantly shorten their lifespan. These are a few of the brittle diabetes symptoms that negatively affect unstable diabetics:

 

  • Kidney damage: The wide swings in blood pressure that brittle diabetics suffer wreak havoc on the small blood vessels. One consequence of this neuropaty is kidney damage and scarring. Over time, as the blood sugar swings continue to destroy the body, the kidneys may stop functioning altogether. In these cases, diabetics must undergo dialysis several times a week to stay alive.

 

  • Diabetic retinopathy: Small blood vessel damage also effects the eyes. Over time, sufferers gradually lose their vision. Diabetics may even go blind if they cannot get their blood pressure under control.

 

  • Amputation: Neuropathy also affects the extremities. As the blood sugar fluctuations cause the nerves to die, diabetics feel numbness or tingling in the feet as the skin gets damaged. As the disease progresses, they may develop foot
    Ulcus bei Diabetes mellitus

    Ulcus bei Diabetes mellitus (Photo credit: rosmary)

    ulcers and other foot problems and may have to have their toes, feet or legs amputated.

 

  • Depression: One of the most insidious effects of brittle diabetes is its impact on your personal life. These diabetics often spend a considerable amount of time in the hospital because of their fluctuating blood sugar levels. The resulting bills, acknowledgment of shortened life expectancy and other concerns often have a profound effect on the psyche.

 

This type of diabetes is one of the most dangerous forms of an already dangerous disease. Because blood sugar levels remain unregulated, manageable diabetic symptoms quickly get out of control. If you think you might suffer from Brittle Diabetes, contact your physician immediately to see if you can find a cure.

 

 

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Can You Have Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes?

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A low blood sugar episode is frightening enough for most people to wonder if they can have hypoglycemia without diabetes. The short answer to that question is “yes”. Low blood sugar episodes can happen to anyone. But certain types of low blood sugar episodes may indicate that you do have diabetes or another significant medical condition.

Hypoglycemia Symptoms

Hypoglycemia is a condition where blood sugar levelsdrop below normal. During the day, a healthy person’s blood sugar fluctuates slightly depending on when their last period of exercise or last meal was. When your blood sugar dips slightly

hypoglycemia

hypoglycemia (Photo credit: Newbirth35)

you may feel hungry, grouchy, nauseous, or even nervous.

Hypoglycemia is a more severe drop in blood pressure. Medically, hypoglycemia is defined as a drop in blood sugar below 70. When your blood sugar levels drop this far, you may feel shaky, sweaty or unsteady on your feet. Your vision may blur and your heart may race. If your blood sugar dips low enough, you may pass out or have a seizure — even if you have low blood sugar without diabetes.

Hypoglycemia without Diabetes

Low blood sugar dips — even those low enough to be defined as hypoglycemia — can happen to normal healthy people who do not have diabetes. These low dips in blood sugar are called reactive hypoglycemia. The symptoms are the same, but the cause is more easily identifiable and in reaction to a state of being.

Meal skipping is a common cause for hypoglycemia without diabetes. As your body burns its sugar reserves, they continue to get lower if you don’t refuel with a meal or a snack. Go without eating for long enough, and your blood sugar will get low enough to cause a hypoglycemic episode.hypoglycemia without diabetes

Vigorous exercise — especially on an empty stomach — is another way to burn through your blood sugar reserves and cause non-diabetic postprandial hypoglycemia. Exercise hard and forget to eat afterward and your blood sugar may dip dangerously. As soon as your endorphin rush dies down, you may begin to feel poorly.

If you can find a cause for your hypoglycemia, then there’s very little cause to worry. A simple sugary snack or 1/2 cup of juice will make you feel better in a few minutes. However, if you cannot find a cause for your low blood sugar episode, there may be cause to worry.

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia that occurs frequently is not a sign of good health and may be cause for concern. These severe drops in blood sugar may cause you to stop thinking clearly, shake or even pass out. Frequent drops in blood sugar are dangerous. They slowly wear away at the body’s organs and nerves and cause irreversible damage.

If you’re experiencing frequent drops in blood sugar, it is important to see your doctor. A physical examination will quickly pin point the problem. You may simply have hypoglycemia without diabetes. Or you may be able to identify a course of treatment or a hypoglycemia diet to stop scary blood pressure drops from happening so frequently.

Diabetes is not the only common cause of hypoglycemia. Frequent low blood sugar dips may indicate a problem with the liver, kidneys, pancreas or metabolism. Patients recovering from stomach surgery and those who frequently drink alcohol or take certain medications may also experience frequent blood sugar drops.

You can most certainly have hypoglycemia without diabetes. Healthy bodies run low on fuel at certain times. And while blood sugar drops can be worry, there’s usually no need for alarm.

But if you notice frequent hypoglycemic episodes that occur without periods of fasting or heavy exercise, it is best to see someone. A quick diagnosis and course of hypoglycemia treatment is the best way to avoid permanent damage. Or at the very least you’ll have the peace of mind of knowing you’re experiencing hypoglycemia without diabetes or any other significant health problems.

 

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Type 3 Diabetes Attacks Your Brain?

 

Most of us have heard about type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but Type 3 diabetes barely puts a blip on the radar. Although discovered in 2005, this new condition is just beginning to pop up on the headlines of today’s science and medical news journals. Lay people still have a lot to learn.

When it comes to type 3 diabetes, Wikipedia doesn’t even have the answers. The relatively new discovery of the disease leaves people concerned about their health searching for answers. Read on for a quick primer on diabetes mellitus 3 and how it may be affecting your health or the health of your loved ones.

Type 3 Diabetes: What is it?

During a study conducted at the Rhode Island Hospital and Brown Medical School, researchers made a groundbreaking discovery: the hormone insulin was not just produced by the pancreas as previously thought. After careful study of their Type 3 Diabetessubjects, the researchers discovered that the brain was also responsible to producing small amounts of insulin. This discovery led to several more important revelations.

One of those revelations was the discovery of insulin’s effect on the brain. One of those effects on the brain is the development of diabetes mellitus 3. Type 3 diabetes is a condition where the brain does not produce enough insulin. In the absence of insulin, the brain is affected much the way the body is in type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In fact, diabetes mellitus 3 only occurs in people who have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes already.

Type 3 Diabetes: Alzheimer’s in Disguise

Diabetes mellitus 3 is also known as brain diabetes. This is because the brain requires insulin to form new memories. Receptors on the brain’s synapses help facilitate the communication that creates new memories. The insulin produced by the brain wards off amyloid beta-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs)that destroy those receptors.

In diabetes mellitus 3, the brain is either doesn’t produce enough insulin for new memory formation or is resistant to the insulin it produces. Without insulin, those insulin receptors die. Without those insulin receptors, the brain can’t form new memories.

This inability to form new memories is what produces the type 3 diabetes symptoms, signs and difficulties that mimic those of Alzheimer’s and dementia. Sufferers experience the memory loss and confusion that is typical of both diseases. Because of the similarity of these diseases, doctors often have trouble diagnosing diabetes mellitus 3 unless they are specifically looking for it using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning technology.

Type 3 Diabetes: Treatment

Diabetes mellitus 3 was only officially recognized as an illness in 2005. But doctors already know quite a bit about how to treat the disease. Much of that head start is thanks to the fact that the treatment for type 3 diabetes symptoms is very similar to the treatment for diabetes mellitus 2.

One of the keys to treating and preventing the onset of diabetes mellitus 3 is to exercise. Regular exercise three to five times a week combined with a healthy diet helps to maintain the healthy weight that wards off the disease. Obesity — especially in women — is a key factor in the onset of both type 2 and type 3 diabetes.

Doctors also treat diabetes mellitus 3 with the same drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes like regular doses of insulin and insulin-sensitizing rosiglitazone. These drugs actually slow and even prevent further memory loss. They do this by protecting the brain’s neurons from the damaging ADDLs.

Cholesterol build up is another similarity between diabetes of all types and Alzheimers. Certain preliminary trials have found that lipid lowering drugs used to fight high cholesterol are effective in treating diabetes mellitus 3. Today, many type 3 diabetes sufferers are turning to this drug for relief.

Diabetes mellitus 3 is a newly-discovered disease that leaves many questions still to be answered. But as we discover more about all types of diabetes, treatments are improving. If you or someone you know is suffering from the symptoms of type 3 diabetes, Mayo Clinic and Wikipedia searches aren’t enough. Contact your doctor as soon as possible to catch and treat type 3 diabetes in its primary stage.

 

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